NREL Conduit Blog

The NREL Conduit Blog discusses research relevant to state, local, and tribal governments. Contributing authors provide posts related to events, policy analysis, and decision support outcomes to inform the market in a credible and timely fashion.

Guidebook Explores Regulatory Barriers and Potential Solutions for Tribal Solar Projects

June 16, 2023 by Laura Beshilas

Tribal land holds more that 5% of the solar photovoltaic potential in the United States, according to a 2013 report by NREL.

NREL Supports Alaska Utility Amid Coal Plant Retirement Through Communities to Clean Energy Program

Jan. 17, 2023

In early December 2022, a snowstorm hit Fairbanks, Alaska, blanketing the city of around 32,000 people in six inches of snow and dumping even more on the surrounding hillsides.

Meet the State, Local, and Tribal Program Team: Kevin McCabe

Oct. 31, 2022 by Kerrin Jeromin

In this blog, meet Kevin McCabe, a clean energy researcher who serves as the lead for NREL’s tribal energy activities.

New Report Provides Highlights of the State, Local, and Tribal Program Accomplishments in Fiscal Year 2021

Dec. 9, 2021 by Brooke Van Zandt, Kerrin Jeromin

If NREL had to “show-and-tell” the human impacts of its work today, what would stand out? The State, Local, and Tribal Program (SLT) team’s fiscal year (FY) 2021 accomplishments would.

How Is Solar PV Performing in Hurricane-struck Locations?

Oct. 24, 2017 by Eliza Hotchkiss

The ongoing 2017 Atlantic hurricane season has already been the most active since 2005. Hurricane Harvey, classified as a Category 4 storm, made landfall on the Texas Gulf Coast on August 25th with winds topping 130 mph and inundating the City of Houston with over 50 inches of rain in some areas, claiming upwards of 30 lives. Seventy percent of surrounding Harris County was covered with more than a foot of water, which flooded roughly 136,000 buildings. 

Solar Energy Improving Resiliency: A Look at California During a Historical Drought

Aug. 19, 2015 by Alexandra Aznar

In February, the Solar STAT blog featured a post on 2012’s Hurricane Sandy and  how solar PV can support disaster resiliency . Extreme weather events are not limited to hurricanes, of course. Others, like California’s ongoing drought, pose additional challenges for electricity generators but also demonstrate an emerging role for solar energy.

How Solar PV Can Support Disaster Resiliency

Feb. 3, 2015 by Eliza Hotchkiss

When Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the east coast of the United States, New Jersey was ranked second in the country for solar photovoltaic (PV) implementation—only behind California. However, when millions of New Jerseyans were without power after the storm, only two PV systems in the state were operational.


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