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Mark Stock

Scientific Visualization Specialist

Mark.Stock@nrel.gov | 303-275-4174

Dr. Stock is a part-time contractor working with NREL's Insight Center on a variety of technical projects. His professional titles range from research scientist to software engineer, to entrepreneur, to artist.

As a scientist, Dr. Stock's work focuses on parallel computation of unsteady, turbulent flows using vortex particle methods, while touching on topics in fast hierarchical methods, computational geometry, and general-purpose computing on GPUs. His software development knowledge encompasses computer graphics, virtual reality, parallel computing, and manipulation of large spatial data sets. As an artist, he creates print, multimedia, and interactive artwork using his own CFD codes and research. He is represented by SENSE Fine Art in Menlo Park, California, and while working for Brooklyn-based artist Adam Frank, Dr. Stock built the SUNLIGHT artwork that is installed on the Webb Building in downtown Denver. In addition, he started the Boston Virtual Reality Meetup group, develops physics plugins for games and demos for Oculus Rift, and runs a 3D printing design company called TinyMtn.

Research Interests

Highly parallel and GPU Computing

Scientific visualization and virtual reality 

Fluid dynamics and computational physics

Education

Ph.D.,  Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan

Featured Publications

Flow Simulation with Vortex ElementsBiologically-Inspired Computing for the Arts: Scientific Data through Graphics (2012) 

GPU-Accelerated Boundary Element Method and Vortex Particle Method, Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information, and Communication (2011) 

Toward efficient GPU-accelerated N-body simulations, 46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit (2008) 

Impact of a vortex ring on a density interface using a regularized inviscid vortex sheet method, Journal of Computational Physics (2008) 

Creative flow visualization using a physically accurate lighting model, Second Conference on Computational Semiotics for Games and New Media (2002)