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Craig Perkins

Researcher V-Chemistry

Craig.Perkins@nrel.gov | 303-384-6659

Dr. Perkins currently is a senior scientist in NREL’s Interfacial and Surface Science group, where he works with photovoltaic and energy materials. The group operates a unique cluster tool based on a physically integrated suite of deposition, surface modification, and analytical instruments. The tool includes two molecular beam epitaxy systems, two photoemission systems, a field-emission scanning Auger microprobe, a glovebox, a setup for low-current, low-energy electron diffraction, and a variable-temperature scanning probe microscope. Because of recent studies indicating the importance of photovoltaic module soiling by atmospheric dust, Dr. Perkins has become interested in understanding adhesion between particulate matter and surfaces representative of photovoltaic modules.

Research Interests

Dr. Perkins’ research interests are the physics and chemistry of multinary compound surfaces as they relate to photovoltaics, energy, and environmental sciences, including:

  • surface chemical reactions
  • electronic structure
  • hybrid organic-inorganic materials
  • interface engineering
  • metal chalcogenides
  • self-assembled monolayers
  • nanoparticles
  • two-dimensional materials
  • single crystals
  • model systems. 

Education

University of Illinois/Chicago, Ph.D. Chemistry, 1998

University of Florida, B.S. Chemistry, 1990

Featured Publications

E.M. Miller, C.L. Perkins, et al., “Revisiting the Valence and Conduction Band Size Dependence of PbS Quantum Dot Thin Films,” ACS Nano 10(3) 3302–3311 (2016) DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.5b06833

M.O. Reese, C.L. Perkins, et al., “Intrinsic Surface Passivation of CdTe,” J. Appl. Phys. 118, 155305 (2015) DOI: 10.1063/1.4933186

C.L. Perkins, “Molecular Anchors for Self-Assembled Monolayers on ZnO:  A Direct Comparison of the Thiol and Phosphonic Acid Moieties,” J. Phys. Chem. 113(42), 18276–18286 (2009) DOI: 10.1021/jp906013r

View all NREL publications for Craig L. Perkins.